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Monday, March 30, 2015

About Anger part i

Ursula K. Le Guin, photo by Marian Wood KolischAbout Anger
i. Saeva indignatio

by Ursula K. Le Guin
In the consciousness-raising days of the second wave of feminism, we made a big deal out of anger, the anger of women. We praised it and cultivated it as a virtue. We learned to boast of being angry, to swagger our rage, to play the Fury.
We were right to do so. We were telling women who believed they should patiently endure insults, injuries, and abuse that they had every reason to be angry. We were rousing people to feel and see injustice, the methodical mistreatment to which women were subjected, the almost universal disrespect of the human rights of women, and to resent and refuse it for themselves and for others. Indignation, forcibly expressed, is an appropriate response to injustice. Indignation draws strength from outrage, and outrage draws strength from rage. There is a time for anger, and that was such a time.
Anger is a useful, perhaps indispensable, tool in motivating resistance to injustice. But I think it is a weapon — a tool useful only in combat and self-defense.
People to whom male dominance is important or essential fear women’s resistance, therefore women’s anger — they know a weapon when they see one. The backlash from them was immediate and predictable. Those who see human rights as consisting of men’s rights labeled every woman who spoke up for justice as a man-hating, bra-burning, intolerant shrew. With much of the media supporting their view, they successfully degraded the meaning of the words feminism and feminist, identifying them with intolerance to the point of making them almost useless, even now.
The far right likes to see everything in terms of warfare. If you look at the feminism of 1960-90 that way, you might say it worked out rather like the Second World War: the people who lost it gained a good deal, in the end. These days, overt male dominance is less taken for granted; the gender gap in take-home pay is somewhat narrower; there are more women in certain kinds of high positions, particularly in higher education; within certain limits and in certain circumstances, girls can act uppity and women can assume equality with men without risk. As the old ad with the cocky bimbo smoking a cigarette said, You’ve come a long way, baby.
Oh gee, thanks, boss. Thanks for the lung cancer, too.
Perhaps — to follow the nursery metaphor instead of the battlefield one — if feminism was the baby, she’s now grown past the stage where her only way to get attention to her needs and wrongs was anger, tantrums, acting out, kicking ass. In the cause of gender rights, mere anger now seldom proves a useful tool. Indignation is still the right response to indignity, to disrespect, but in the present moral climate it seems to be most effective expressed through steady, resolute, morally committed behavior and action.
This is clearly visible in the issue of abortion rights, where the steadfast nonviolence of rights defenders faces the rants, threats, and violence of rights opponents. The opponents would welcome nothing so much as violence in return. If NARAL vented rage as Tea Party spokesmen do, if the clinics brandished guns to defend themselves from the armed demonstrators, the opponents of abortion rights on the Supreme Court would hardly have to bother dismantling Roe vs Wade by degrees, as they’re doing. The cause would be already lost.
As it is, it may suffer a defeat, but if we who support it hold firm it will never be lost.
Anger points powerfully to the denial of rights, but the exercise of rights can’t live and thrive on anger. It lives and thrives on the dogged pursuit of justice.
If women who value freedom are dragged back into open conflict with oppression, forced to defend ourselves against the re-imposition of unjust laws, we will have to call on anger as a weapon again: but we’re not at that point yet, and I hope nothing we do now brings us closer to it.
Anger continued on past its usefulness becomes unjust, then dangerous. Nursed for its own sake, valued as an end in itself, it loses its goal. It fuels not positive activism but regression, obsession, vengeance, self-righteousness. Corrosive, it feeds off itself, destroying its host in the process. The racism, misogyny, and counter-rationality of the reactionary right in American politics for the last several years is a frightening exhibition of the destructive force of anger deliberately nourished by hate, encouraged to rule thought, invited to control behavior. I hope our republic survives this orgy of self-indulgent rage.
–UKL

Ursula LeGuin holds copyright on this article, which originally appeared on LeGuin's blog (89a). It can also be read at BookView Cafe

Thursday, March 26, 2015

MIRIAM GOODMAN AT NCC


"WORKING WITH SURVIVORS OF DOMESTIC SEX TRAFFICKING AND TRAUMA"
3/25









MIRIAM WITH PROFESSOR MARY LANNON AND STUDENT NATALIA RODRIGUEZ





Tuesday, March 24, 2015

GIRL BE HEARD AT NCC

Girl Be Heard's performance of "TRAFFICKED" was moving and inspirational.  

Learn more about Girl Be Heard HERE.






Wednesday, March 18, 2015

AUTHOR ROXANE GAY AT NCC


SEAN AND ROXANE


DAQUAN, CHRISTINA, AND MARVIN AT THE RECEPTION


HOLLIS, LUCIA, ROXANE, AND SARA

Saturday, March 14, 2015

Friday, March 13, 2015

WST Testimonial


Women's Studies 101
by Christie Conway
 
Women Studies is an interdisciplinary subject that cuts across all aspects of life. Women and men need Women Studies because it influences and affects everyone. Women Studies changed my life in positive ways by opening up my eyes to social, economic and political issues we live with every day. Without Women Studies I would never feel as confidant and as beautiful in my own skin as I do today. Women Studies allows women of all ages, shapes, and sizes to feel as beautiful as they should. Women should be allowed to wear as much or as little make up as they desire and feel equally beautiful both ways. We have learned that we need to judge less on appearance because appearance does not define who someone is. In Women Studies we learned how important it is to understand, relate, and uplift others. We learned we should never feel self-conscious and how important it is to have a positive self-image and how to help other women achieve a positive self-image. We also learned how our early stages in life influence the type of person we will become in the future because of the ways we are socialized by our gender. As a community we should be educated in Women Studies so we can help bring equality and eliminate the competition this world brings on such beautiful women.

Monday, March 2, 2015

RACHEL LLOYD

THURSDAY, 3/5
CCB 252 
2:30

JOIN US IN WELCOMING 
RACHEL LLOYD





LLOYD WILL DISCUSS HER WORK AS FOUNDER AND C.E.O. OF GIRLS EDUCATION AND MENTORING SERVICE, AN ORGANIZATION DESIGNED TO PROVIDE ALTERNATIVES TO INCARCERATION FOR GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED COMMERCIAL SEXUAL EXPLOITATION.
COPIES OF LLOYD'S BOOK, GIRLS LIKE US, WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE.

ALL ARE WELCOME.

CONTACT SARA.HOSEY@NCC.EDU FOR MORE INFO.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

EVENT

Tuesday, March 3, 2015 
 11:30am - 12:45pm in GC 65 

​ Trigger Warning ​:  
Exploring Rape and Sexual Assault through Photography

​Join Lydia Billings, creator of Trigger Warning​,​ for a look at how art can serve as effective advocacy and action within communities committed to non-violence. ​Trigger Warning ​ a is multi-media photographic arts project committed to ending rape, and one which​  aims to ignite anti-rape action while welcoming opportunities for viewers to become more aware of rape as individualized violence, a societal epidemic, and to comprehend the impact rape has on the integrity of global humanity. Artist and activist Lydia Billings is a graduate of the Rochester Institute of Technology and currently teaches photography in the NYC region. This Art Forum event is being held in conjunction with Women's History Month and is cosponsored by the NCC Women's Studies Project, the Photo Club, and Student Activities.
All are welcome for this Art Forum! 
FYI - GC 65 is in the basement of the G building in the Art wing.