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Thursday, July 31, 2014

LINKS

VIA HUFFPO
SHARED WITH YOU BY LAURA.
 
LP writes: I laughed so hard I cried.  On the train.  At 8am.
 
AND
 
VIA THE DAILY NEWS
 
LP writes: Hahahahahahahahahahahah!
 
AND  
 
BY KAREN CORDANO
VIA HUFFPO


Wednesday, July 30, 2014

WATCH

VIA HUFF PO LIVE
SHARED WITH YOU BY SHANICE.



"AllHipHop's Chuck Creekmur wrote an open letter to rapper Nicki Minaj revealing why he, as a father, thinks her new "Anaconda" cover is problematic. But are concerns about Minaj's cover reasonable or a case of selective outrage?"

Shanice says:

Chuck Creekmur did a really awful job of defending himself. He’s an idiot.

LINKS FROM LAURA


VIA UPWORTHY

AND


VIA NPR

A poor door?  Really?  Ugh.

BAD FEMINIST

READ 
THE NYT PROFILE OF 


I can't wait to get her book!

SHARED WITH YOU BY SARA.


"Even if you don't like it, you're supposed to appear that you do"

READ

BY NOAH BERLATSKY
VIA THE ATLANTIC


Writer and activist Feminista Jones talks about street harassment against black women and the #YouOKsis campaign.


SHARED WITH YOU BY TIM STRODE.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

READ THIS

BY MICHELLE GOLDBERG
THE NEW YORKER
 
SHARED WITH YOU BY TIM STRODE.

THE HIVE

FROM WINNYC:

Feminist Dialogue - Launching THE HIVE!

Perhaps you’ve heard the rumors … Feminist Dialogue is a community of
feminists of all stripes building the movement to reclaim, redefine, and
rebrand feminism as an inclusive, diverse, experiential, and evocative
community.


Bitches Who Brunch, our feminist salon series, has been reborn as
The Hive - same fabulous concept, same emphasis on a feminism of listening,
sharing, and collaboration.


The Hive aptly speaks to Feminist Dialogue’s belief that together we are
stronger, together we are able to build something beyond the individual,
and together we can change the world.
August 23rd: Queens “Reproductive Rights/Justice”
<http://www.eventbrite.com/e/bitches-who-brunch-august-2014-tickets-11575507655>

Find us on Twitter <https://twitter.com/FeministDialog>, Facebook
<https://www.facebook.com/feministdialogue>, and Instagram
< ../Downloads/instagram.com/feministdialogue> for your much-needed dose of
Feminist Dialogue.


Join the virtual discussion in our Facebook group
<https://www.facebook.com/groups/feministdialog>, where every Thursday we
release a new topic to dissect with your huge feminist brains.


MARK YOUR CALENDAR

OCTOBER 9-12, 2014
CHANGING THE WORLD
THROUGH FEMININE LEADERHIP AND ENTREPENEURSHIP

Confirmed Speakers: Arianna Huffington, Brené Brown, Eve Ensler, Kris Carr, Danielle LaPorte, and many more!

Click here for more information.

Shared with you by Florence Dee Boodakian.

Saturday, July 26, 2014

LINK FROM SARA

BY MICHELLE NIJHUIS
VIA THE LAST WORD ON NOTHING

From the article:
"Despite what can seem like a profusion of heroines in kids’ books, girls are still underrepresented in children’s literature. A 2011 study of 6,000 children’s books published between 1900 and 2000 showed that only 31 percent had female central characters. While the disparity has declined in recent years, it persists—particularly, and interestingly, among animal characters. And many books with girl protagonists take place in male-dominated worlds, peopled with male doctors and male farmers and mothers who have to ask fathers for grocery money (Richard Scarry, I’m looking at you). The imbalance is even worse in kids’ movies: Geena Davis’ Institute on Gender and Media found that for every female character in recent family films, there are three male characters. Crowd scenes, on average, are only 17 percent female.
More insidiously, children’s books with girl protagonists sometimes celebrate their heroines to a fault. Isn’t it amazing that a girl did these things, they seem to say—implying that these heroines are a freakish exception to their gender, not an inspiration for readers to follow. Children’s lit could benefit from a Finkbeiner Test. (Well-intentioned kids’ media can, ironically, introduce their youngest listeners and viewers to gender barriers: The first time my daughter heard the fabulous album Free to Be … You and Me, she asked “Why isn’t it all right for boys to cry?”)."

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

BEYONCE ON INSTAGRAM



Shared with you by Sara.

PATRICIA LOCKWOOD, by Sara

Lockwood's new book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals was reviewed in the NYT this weekend.  

From the review:

"Pointless weirdness gets old fast...but here the weirdness almost always carries a magnificent, and political, point. If sexual and social norms make some of us (especially the young) feel monstrous, out of place, unheard, unprotected or out of control, then Lockwood will speak for the monsters — for the Loch Ness monster, for example, in “Nessie Wants to Watch Herself Doing It” (“Doing what, I don’t know, being alive”). Like the best stand-up comics, Lockwood seeks honesty, an honesty inseparable (for her) from the jarring, the awkward, the malformed, the disconcerting, from the tones and topics (especially sexual ones) usually excluded from polite company."

Here is the beginning of Lockwood's "Rape Joke."  You can read the rest of the poem here.    I recommend it.


Rape Joke
by Patricia Lockwood
The rape joke is that you were 19 years old.
The rape joke is that he was your boyfriend.
The rape joke it wore a goatee. A goatee.
Imagine the rape joke looking in the mirror, perfectly reflecting back itself, and grooming itself to look more like a rape joke. “Ahhhh,” it thinks. “Yes. A goatee.”
No offense.
The rape joke is that he was seven years older. The rape joke is that you had known him for years, since you were too young to be interesting to him. You liked that use of the word interesting, as if you were a piece of knowledge that someone could be desperate to acquire, to assimilate, and to spit back out in different form through his goateed mouth.
Then suddenly you were older, but not very old at all.
The rape joke is that you had been drinking wine coolers. Wine coolers! Who drinks wine coolers? People who get raped, according to the rape joke.
….

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Orientation by Anonymous Student

"At orientation there was a huge focus on sexual assault due to the high risk of freshmen, especially, on college campuses. What I was most happy about was that they were not putting the responsibility on the girls alone to prevent rape from happening. I expected a lecture to the female students about staying together, not walking alone, not putting our drinks down.. But not only were we told that, but they also really focused on educating the male students on rape, what is rape, when consent isn't present and when someone is unable to consent. Not only were they teaching females how not to be assaulted, but also taught the males not to assault. It made me feel a lot safer and happier knowing the lessons are not one-sided on the females' part like society usually makes them."

LINK FROM LAURA

BY ELIZABETH PLANK
VIA IDENTITY.MIC

EXTENDED HOURS AT NCC'S CHILDREN'S GREENHOUSE by Sara


CHILD CARE IS A SOCIAL JUSTICE ISSUE


Our amazing day care center here on campus has announced that they’ll be providing more hours for parents who need child care.
Day care on campus is so important—especially at community colleges. The American Association of University Women recently published a report, “Women in Community College: Access to Success” that emphasizes the importance of on-site childcare for student parent success. The authors state that "student parents consistently cite child care responsibilities as a chief reason for dropping out of community college before achieving a degree or certificate" (2) and that "having access to reliable and affordable child care helps student parents stay in school" (23). Access is to child care is not just a retention issue; it’s a social justice issue.

So kudos to NCC for supporting the Greenhouse and to the Greenhouse for meeting the needs of so many students—and faculty.  I personally don’t know what I would do without the Greenhouse; the availability of excellent child care has made all the difference in my own professional life.
 
Here is there updated schedule and contact information for those who might be interested in using the Children’s Greenhouse:

Mon.: 7:15 AM to 8:00 PM
Tues.: 7:15 AM to 8:30 PM
Wed.: 7:15 AM to 8:00 PM
Thurs.: 7:15 AM to 8:30 PM
Fri.: 7:15 ...AM to 5:30 PM


Interested parents should call 516-572-7614 or email childcare@ncc.edu for more information.

Thursday, July 17, 2014

#TBT THE GLORIA STEINEM EDITION



"Any woman who chooses to behave like a full human being should be warned that the armies of the status quo will treat her as something of a dirty joke. That's their natural and first weapon. She will need her sisterhood."
"Sisterhood" in New York Magazine, 1979.

Shared with you by Sara.



WATCH THIS VIDEO


SHARED WITH YOU BY TIM STRODE

LINKS FROM SARA

READ
 
BY AYA DE LEON
VIA FEMINIST WIRE
 
AND
 
BY BRITTNEY COOPER
VIA SALON

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

UPCOMING FILM SCREENING

FROM WINNYC:
 
Join the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, Ipas, Las
Libres and the NYU Center for Multicultural Education and Program on
July17, 2014
from 6 pm to 8 pm
at
NYU’s Kimmel Center,
60 Washington Square
South, Room 808, New York, NY
for the U.S premiere of
 
“Las Libres:
The Story Continues…..”



We will be joined by some of the individuals featured
in the film, including Verónica Cruz, the Executive Director of Las Libres,
and Manuela Castañeira, the Director of Las Rojas.
 
Las Libres documents the violation of women’s rights in Guanajato, Mexico
at the hands of harsh and draconian state laws criminalizing abortion.

Between 2000 and 2008, these laws were used to send 130 women in the state
to prison—often for sentences of 25 to 30 years—for the “crimes” of
abortion and miscarriage. This new and critically acclaimed documentary
shares the stories of 6 of these women and highlights the role of *Las
Libres*, a non-governmental organization (NGO) that denounced the laws and
fought alongside the unjustly incarcerated women for their freedom.

Las Libres exposes the resulting human rights violations in Mexico,
demonstrating the true impact of laws criminalizing abortion. The
documentary reveals the malicious nature of conservative agendas that work
to limit and restrict women’s rights and reproductive health, not only in
Mexico, but also in countries such as the United States. Yet, in telling
the story of *Las Libres*, the film also lifts up and celebrates the many
organizations and individuals in the relentless fight to defend and promote
women’s rights in Mexico, Argentina, and around the globe.

To RSVP or for any questions, please contact: Desiree@latinainstitute.org.
 
LEARN MORE ABOUT THE FILM AND WATCH THE TRAILER HERE.
 
Shared with you by Sara.
 

Monday, July 14, 2014

THE GUERRILLA GIRLS



IN RESPONSE TO THE SEXISM OF THE ART WORLD, THE GUERRILLA GIRLS HAVE BEEN MAKING ACTIVIST ART FOR OVER 30 YEARS.  


FROM 2012:



YOU CAN READ MORE ABOUT THE GUERRILLA GIRLS HERE.

SHARED WITH YOU BY SARA

Sunday, July 13, 2014

IN THE NYT THIS WEEKEND

READ
NICHOLAS KRISTOF'S ARTICLE, 



From the article:
"It has been almost three months since Islamic militants in northern Nigeria attacked a school that was giving exams and kidnapped more than 250 girls — some of the brightest and most ambitious teenagers in the region."

AND



From the article:
""It took the college just 12 days to investigate the rape report, hold a hearing and clear the football players. The football team went on to finish undefeated in its conference, while the woman was left, she said, to face the consequences — threats and harassment for accusing members of the most popular sports team on campus."

SHARED WITH YOU BY SARA.

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

LINK FROM SARA

READ THIS ARTICLE ON 
FROM THE
CRUNK FEMINIST COLLECTIVE

I'M PRETTY DISAPPOINTED BY SEASON 2 OF OITNB, by Sara




I really enjoyed the first season of Orange is the New Black. I found it entertaining and moving and, like many viewers, I liked that it centered on women’s lives and experiences.  I also appreciated the diversity in the cast and in the stories.  And, perhaps most importantly, I applauded the way the program handled serious, real-world issues facing incarcerated women and introduced them to a larger audience. 

This is why I’ve found season 2 such a disappointment so far.  (I’m only about 5 episodes in, so maybe I’ll have to eat my words.  I’ll let you know).  Themes and issues explored with sensitivity, realism, and complexity in season 1 have been emptied of their political implications and transformed into standard ridiculous television nonsense in season 2.  Here are just two examples.
(SPOILER ALERT). 
In season 1, Morello is depicted as obsessing over her upcoming wedding to Christopher.  We get the sense, though, that something is amiss when another inmate points out that Christopher has never come to visit Morello.
This moment in season 1 begins to suggest the isolation of a prison conviction, the ways in which inmates might come to feel forgotten by the outside world.  It might even begin to indicate a larger, systemic problem: as numerous incarcerated individuals as well as researchers have pointed out, while men can often count on wives and girlfriend’s visits, women in prison are often not visited by the men in their lives.  There are numerous reasons for this, but one is certainly that women’s prisons are usually located farther away from women’s home communites, making such visits even harder on family and friends.
And so Morello’s story in some ways comes to represent a larger and more troubling reality about many women’s prison experiences. 

However, in season 2, we learn that, in fact, Morello is a stalker who has fabricated her entire history with Christopher.  That is, it’s not that he doesn’t come to visit because, tragically, he no longer loves or supports Morello once she becomes incarcerated.  Instead, she’s a dangerous wacko.  This is made even clearer when Morello goes rogue in the prison van and breaks into Christopher’s house.  This whole episode is so contrived and unbelievable as to make it almost unrecognizable from the more well-considered, realistic episodes in season 1.
Another example: in season 1, Taystee gets out of prison and finds that she has no safe or supportive place to go.  A former foster mother reluctantly gives her temporary shelter, but life "on the outside" is presented as miserable, lonely, and dangerous.  A viewer can understand how or why Taystee might see prison life--the community and routine she has in prison--as preferable or at least less-scary than what awaits her outside.

Thus, this episode also depicts some painful realities about incarceration and recidivism.  Family support--in addition to programs designed to assist the recently released-- is crucial to a former inmates' successful transition to life outside of prison. 
But in season 2, Taystee’s return to prison is spun as a result of not having the support of a particular individual—Vee—a woman who we find out had acted as Taystee’s surrogate mother.  Even putting aside the discrepancies with what we saw in season 1, this plot change again begins to empty the political implications of the season 1 story.  Taystee returns to prison not because she was failed by a larger system that didn't provide her with a safe place to live, adequate job training or opportunities, or the resources she would need to succeed, but because an individual--Vee--failed her. 
What I'm saying is that both of these “changes” or elaborations on the earlier stories back away from what made OITNB so exciting in the first place: a revealing and honest look at some of the less-discussed obstacles facing incarcerated and formerly-incarcerated people and a potentially radical critique of systemic problems in both the prison world and our larger culture. 

This is too bad. Season 1 remains smart and funny and heartbreaking and I hope that the writers get back on track later this season or maybe in future seasons.  As my friend Shanice (a WST Fem contributor) pointed out, the Riverhead Correctional Facility, where OITNB films, has recently come under fire for truly horrendous living conditions (including overflowing sewage in the bathrooms--also a plot point in OITNB); there is surely fodder for future episodes here.   Rather than focusing on the over-the-top and sometimes absurd plotlines that the creators might feel they need in order to stay fresh and edgy, perhap they will return to the formula that proved so successful in season 1: subtlety, humor, and honesty, with a dash of social-consciouness. 

Monday, July 7, 2014

THIS SOUNDS AWESOME

The New York Times Feminist Reading Group



The New York Times Feminist Reading Group

TThursday, June 19, 2014 at 7 p.m. 

Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Forum, 4th Floor
The New York Times Feminist Reading Group is a participatory performance by Jen Kennedy and Liz Linden where you’re invited to discuss events in that day’s issue of the Times from a feminist perspective.

Throughout 2014, the artists will be collecting and scanning the newspapers that have been discussed, marked up, dog-eared, and annotated in the reading groups. The scans will then be compiled in The New York Times Feminist Yearbook, to be published at the end of the year.

Free with Museum admission.
Shared with you by Sara


Parental Leave, by a friend of WSTFEM

I was reading a French daily paper and the big news today is that the parental leave was extended but only if it is the father that takes it (or the mother if it was the father who took it at first). The current benefit is that either the father or the mother can take the parental leave (this is in addition to  maternity leave, which is fully paid).  Parental leave gives you a very small allowance and you have the choice of not working at all (with only the small allowance) or working a certain % of your workload, with % reduction of your pay. But you are guaranteed your job back after the leave and of course, you keep fully paid health insurance  benefits during the leave. 


For a comparison of maternity leave in the world, read "MATERNITY LEAVES AROUND THE WORLD: WORST AND BEST COUNTRIES FOR PAID MATERNITY LEAVE."

The US is amongst the worst.  (In France, for the first child, you get 16 weeks fully paid maternity leave for the mother and fully paid 11 days of paternity leave for the father).




Thursday, July 3, 2014

#TBT, Shared with you by Sara


STUFF TO SEE AT MOMA

GET TO THE MOMA THIS SUMMER AND SEE
 
 
WHILE YOU'RE THERE, CHECK OUT
 


 
SHARED WITH YOU BY SARA
 

PIMP-SHAMING by Sara

The Oakland Police department is trying out a new strategy to combat sex trafficking: pimp-shaming. 

From Time:

"On a new website, the department lists the mug shots of alleged pimps and johns, along with their names, dates of birth and charges against them. The pictures come with the disclaimer that while those in the photos have been arrested and charged, they 'are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.'"

It does seem to me that we're finally moving away from the uncritical mainstream glorification of the pimp--evidenced by "Pimps and Ho's Parties" and the Pimp Halloween costume (also available in kids' sizes!) and the Oscar Award winning song "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp" (if you haven't seen the primetime network T.V. perfomance at the Academy Awards, watch it  here).  So yes, let's humiliate, rather than celebrate, the pimp.  I also don't think it's a bad idea to convey the idea that these are "real" people--not the benign goofball caricature these representations and costumes might suggest.

Finally, law enforcement is focusing on arresting the pimps and johns and not the prostitutes--who as we know are most often women and/or children.  To read more about the injustice of punishing a sexually exploited child rather than a exploitative adult, check out the documentary Very Young Girls, Rachel's Lloyd's book Girls Like Us or her TED talk.

LINKS FROM LAURA

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

LINKS FROM SARA

RESPONSE TO THE
HOBBY LOBBY 
RULING


WATCH

THE ALWAYS AD


 The ad reminded me of an anecdote that Tony Porter of "A Call to Men" tells in this powerful talk:

WATCH PORTER'S TED TALK HERE